Brewed compost tea is supposed to be fantastic and nutritious for the garden, but I don’t have time for such involved things (yet). Brewed tea means using additives and aeration and that’s a bit much for my simple approach at this point. So instead, I’m doing steeped compost tea. That’s the easy way, and nearly as effective.

Here’s how – I just started two buckets of steeped compost tea by putting a couple of small shovels of compost each into a five gallon bucket. I added water until nearly full, and now have a deep brown liquid with all kinds of stuff floating in it. I’ll stir it up each time I pass by but I don’t plan to give it too much attention. If it stinks, so be it.

Delicious compost tea. Not for you, for the soil.
Delicious compost tea. Not for you, for the soil.

In a few days, I will be applying it to the garden. I expect a decent injection of nutrients to the plants but also to my soil. My soil is pretty bad this year. My supplier claimed this mixture had topsoil and sand and compost in it. It has topsoil with larger clay chunks, it has nice sand, but the compost is little more than fin wood chips. They are not composted. As they break down in my soil they rob my plants of nitrogen, so my soil is not yet as rich and loamy as it should be in a few years. This is where compost tea contributes good bacteria and microbes to the soil, but also good nutrients and food for the soil critters already there.

Samuel and I also added some worms to the garden to get the population kick started. We bought a few boxes of nightcrawlers from the bait shop and released them into the soil. I did that in the ast and it produced an amazing population of earthworms. Every time we go fishing with worms, we bring home the survivors, they are set free in the garden.

My little man releases worms into the garden.
My little man releases worms into the garden.

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